Title: Alan Taylor Interviews John Hennessey About the Venom gt duration: 17 minutes 13 seconds


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Title: Alan Taylor Interviews John Hennessey About the Venom GT Duration: 17 minutes 13 seconds

https://youtu.be/ttxcV81f1jk
[Video Footage]

Indy cars race around a track.
[Background Music]

Guitar rock music.
[Graphics]

Shell and Pennzoil logos stand over a yellow banner reading "Grand Prix of Houston. Presented by the Greater Houston Honda Dealers." Below the banner, Alan Taylor's signature lies under a white logo: "The Drive."
[Text displays]

Alan Taylor, Automotive Expert/The Drive with Alan Taylor.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: Well, here are at the Shell Pennzoil Grand Prix of Houston with my friend, John Hennessey.
[Video Footage]

Sitting on stools, the two men shake hands.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: Hey, Mr. Taylor. How are ya?

ALAN TAYLOR: John, I’ve been sitting here across from this Cadillac.
[Video footage]

A shiny dark red Cadillac station wagon rests on a gray carpeted floor.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: Yeah.

ALAN TAYLOR: And my guess is, it says twin turbo on the hood.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Yeah.

ALAN TAYLOR: What have we got, 1000 horsepower?

JOHN HENNESSEY: You’re a little low. It’s about 1226 horsepower.

ALAN TAYLOR: 1226 horsepower out of a Cadillac.
[Video footage]

Back of red Cadillac station wagon with Hennessey tag featuring Pennzoil logo.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: It’s a wagon.

ALAN TAYLOR: I know, a wagon, even better. I know something was going on when I saw the giant wheels and the flares on it. Only John Hennessey does that to a Cadillac.
[Text displays]

John Hennessey, Founder & President, Hennessey Performance Engineering.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: It’s a little bit of a sleeper, but you look at it closely, and you're like, there’s something about that Cadillac that’s not stock.

ALAN TAYLOR: (LAUGHING) You build an amazing machine and it lasts.
[Video Footage]

Still photographs of red Cadillac station wagon.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: I try to build it like I’d build it for myself. We build about 500 cars a year, and you know, it’s enthusiast for enthusiasts, so you know, it’s all about fun and having something that’s powerful, but I mean, we build some race cars, but I want people to be able to drive ‘em every day, pump gas on ‘em, pass their smog test, and have something that's reliable and easy to drive.

[Graphics]

Various car magazine covers.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: You’ll see a lot of Hennessey machines on the covers of magazines like Motor Trend, Car and Driver, Road and Track, and the fastest car in the world right now.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Yeah.
[Video Footage]

A still photograph of a silver Venom GT, viewed from the rear.

[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: And he’s wearing it on a shirt, the Venom GT.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Right there. It’s all about Pennzoil.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah. How was that? That was amazing.

JOHN HENNESSEY: It was really cool. I mean, we got a chance to take it to the Space Shuttle Runway at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
[Video Footage]

A man dons a helmet while seated inside the Venom GT. Next, under blue skies, the sleek, dark gray sports car rolls onto a runway.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: The existing record with Bugatti is around 268 miles an hour, and we wanted to beat it by a lot.
[Video Footage]

A view from inside the car as it races down the long runway. A speedometer graphic in the lower right moves from 260 up to 270 before rapidly dropping back down.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: We beat it by a little bit. We ran 270.49, but the car was still accelerating. We were still -- it took us to about 11 seconds to go from 260 to 270, so the car was still pulling. We just ran out of runway.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: So at some point maybe we can go to Baja or somewhere else, but right now it’s the fastest. Somebody was asking me yesterday, “Hey, when you guys gonna go out and run it again?” I’m like, “When I have to.”

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah, yeah, yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: It was expensive, it was time consuming, it was risky, but I’m glad we did it. And, uh, American car and run the record in America, so --
[Video Footage]

John hugs the driver as the team celebrates on the runway.

Still photograph of Venom GT car with driver holding large American flag out the window.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: Let’s talk about the Venom GT. What is it? What do you guys do to make this machine?

JOHN HENNESSEY: The idea of the Venom was to build the fastest car that we could build, and by doing that I didn’t want to just have lots and lots of horsepower. It’s got 1244 horsepower.

ALAN TAYLOR: In a car that weighs under 300 pounds.

JOHN HENNESSEY: It weighs 2743 pounds --

[Alan laughs.]

JOHN HENNESSEY: So it’s about the power to weight ratio.
[Video Footage]

Two men wearing ball caps drive a shiny black Venom GT around an asphalt track.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: It has one horsepower per kilogram of curb weight, so one horsepower per 2.2 pounds. And that’s really an unmatched power to weight ratio, and that’s what makes the car really special.

ALAN TAYLOR: Walk me through its life. Where is it born?

JOHN HENNESSEY: Okay. So basically we didn’t want to start from scratch. We modify cars, that’s what we do, so we wanted to start with something that was very light.
[Video Footage]

Close-ups of various engine parts, including one labeled Pro 128 Dealer ECU.
[Audio]

We looked at the Viper, Ford GT. Those cars were all still too heavy. We just joked about, hey, why don’t we take a Lotus Elise or an Exige and put a V10 twin turbo Viper engine in the back.
[Text displays]

Images and video are provided courtesy of Group Lotus PLC.
[Video Footage]

A red sports car driving in various locations. Next, a series of black-and-white and color sketches of a car.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: We kind of joked about it, but after I did some renderings on it, I thought maybe we can build that car. So what we do is we take an Elise or an Exige from Lotus and we keep the cockpit, so we didn’t have to design the dash, we didn’t have to design the door panels. We kind of already had the interior of a car, and we built our car around it, so it’s all carbon and fiber. Everything from behind the seats is all new. Everything from in front of the dash is all new. So it’s about 90% our car, about 10% Lotus.

ALAN TAYLOR: Which is not a bad thing.

JOHN HENNESSEY: No, it’s not a bad thing, and basically it cut the amount of money that we had to spend and the time that we had to work with by a great deal not having to design door panels and knobs--

ALAN TAYLOR: R&D and all that.

JOHN HENNESSEY: And air conditioning systems. And it gave us what we wanted, super lightweight with maximum horsepower in a usable, comfortable to drive package.

ALAN TAYLOR: So these cars are a taste over a million bucks?

JOHN HENNESSEY: A million two.

ALAN TAYLOR: And how many do you build a year?

JOHN HENNESSEY: We build on average two to three a year. We now have a dealer in China that we’re real excited about with. I met them yesterday, and we think that that’s a great potential market for us. Yeah, we’ve built 12 cars to date, and we’re not gonna build any more than 29 Venom GTs.

ALAN TAYLOR: 12 cars up to today for the Venom GT, yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Right, yeah, we built a total of 12 cars over the last four years.

ALAN TAYLOR: Oh, my gosh. Here’s a car that's, you know, one day is probably gonna hit 300 miles an hour, knowing John Hennessey -- a little guy from Texas here, by the way.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Little guy from Texas.

ALAN TAYLOR: So now you have this great relationship with Shell. You were involved with this big TV production. Roll through that a little.

JOHN HENNESSEY: The folks from Shell were in Houston, the Shell people were in Houston, and the folks at Pennzoil reached out to us at the last Grand Prix back in ’13 and said, “Hey, look, we think we could do some things to help you guys, and we think you could help us promote our brand.” I’m like, “Cool. You guys are Houston guys, you’re car guys, you sponsor the race. Let’s talk about it,” and they said, “We hear you’re working on breaking this record.” I said, “Yeah, Venom GT.” And they said, “Look, we’ve got this brand new synthetic oil product that we’re getting ready to bring to market, and we think that it would be great for your engine.” So they told me about it. It’s called Pure Plus, and they basically take natural gas, convert it to a motor oil, very pure, and when they said the words Roger Penske uses it in his Indy cars and it’s the same stuff you can buy at Walmart or Riley’s or wherever, I’m like, that’s all I need to know. You don’t need to bring on all the scientists. If Penske believes it’s the best and that’s what he runs in his racecars, I’ll try it out,
[Video Footage]

Pennzoil Ultra Premium motor oil is poured into an engine. Mechanics perform various diagnostics.

A close-up of the “Hennessey” logo on the back grill, various car parts, and the “Venom GT” logo on the dashboard.

Men working on cars, running tests.
[Audio]

So we put it in the car and performed flawless. I mean, we did a lot of tests leading up to the 270 run, and when you go to try to make a street car run 270 miles an hour, there’s lots of variables. There’s lots of things we were worried about -- the tires, the driver, is there a critter gonna run across the road?
[Video Footage]

John Hennessey land another man looking at car.

Various shots of side of car, dash, etc.
[Audio]

But it really gave me a lot of peace of mind to know that my engine would be secure, I didn’t have to worry about the oil, I didn’t have to worry about starving for oil or any of the issues that could happen with an oil that’s being pushed at 7500 rpm and 270 miles an hour. That was one problem I didn’t have to worry about.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah, but they do 12,000 rpms in these Indy cars, right?

JOHN HENNESSEY: Exactly, so the nice thing was is they said, “Not only do we want to provide you with the product --
[Text displays]

"Breaking barriers," featuring Tim McGraw. Mankind's pursuit of speed.
[Video Footage]

Black and white footage of people watching an old-style car race across the desert sand.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: We want to try to help tell not only your story, but a story about other guys that have the need for speed and wanted to go out and make a car go fast.” So they hired a TV production company called Bandito Brothers, which did the movie “Act of Valor” which is one of my favorite movies.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: And they came in with us and went with us to NASA when we ran our 270, and then they told a greater story about kind of back at the beginning of automobiles and guys trying to break 35 and 40 miles an hour, leading up to Malcolm Campbell and some of his speed records from back in the 20’s and 30’s.
[Video Footage]

Black and white footage of men running alongside a long narrow race car.
[Graphic]

Campbell: 246 M.P.H.
[Video Footage]

A man wearing a leather helmet and raised goggles looks up and smiles while sitting behind the wheel.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: Right.

JOHN HENNESSEY: To Craig Breedlove with a 600 mile an hour car, back in the 60’s with kind of a home built, you know, Bonneville car with a jet engine out of a scrap yard.

[Alan laughs.]
[Video Footage]

Color footage of a jet-shaped car racing down a desert track.

[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: It was a really cool deal, and you can go to the Pennzoil YouTube channel, and the cool thing is you can click on the "Breaking Barriers…"
[Text displays]

Breaking Barriers featuring Tim McGraw.
[Audio]

…and they have it broken up into, like, ten different sections. You can watch the whole 45 minute deal. It was on National Geographic a couple months ago.
[Video Footage]

Present-day footage of a man getting into a classic car.
[Text displays]

Producer Ari Palitz.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: Right, right, right. It was awesome.

JOHN HENNESSEY: It’s a cool story, and we’re honored to be a part of that story and thankful to the folks at Shell Pennzoil.

ALAN TAYLOR: Your video has been watched -- this is the world’s fastest car right now -- how many times now?

JOHN HENNESSEY: 6.7 million YouTube views in four months.

ALAN TAYLOR: 6.7 million views on YouTube in four months. You got one note from one guy that meant a whole lot to you, and I gotta tell you that’s a tear jerker. The way you did this, by the way, with President Kennedy’s voice, tell that story. This is, like, awesome.

JOHN HENNESSEY: All right, so I’ll like try to keep it brief. So we went to NASA the first time back in January. Got rained out. Kind of a bummer. We regrouped. The Shell folks came in and said, “Look, if you want to go back, we’ll maybe help cover some of your expenses, bring the video guys.” We’re like, “Great, that helps a lot.” So I was working with my guys in the shop, and I wanted to kind of get them some extra motivation to really kind of focus on making the car the best it could be to go out and run the number. And so after church one day, I’m sitting at lunch with my kids and we’re talking about going down to NASA, and I said, “You know,” I said, “this whole thing with the Venom GT, it’s kind of in a way like when the astronauts were trying to go to space and go to the moon.” I said, “It wasn’t an easy deal, but they knew that because it was gonna be really hard, they would learn a lot, and they would become better engineers, better pilots, better astronauts.” And I said, “Really, it’s kind of the same way for us on a much smaller scale. By us doing something that’s hard, not because it’s easy, we’ll be a better team, and we’ll have a better car.” Went on YouTube, found a video clip that’s called the Kennedy Moon Speech. He gave it at Rice University here in Houston back in September ’61.

[Video Footage]

Color footage of President Kennedy giving a speech outdoors.
JOHN HENNESSEY: So I sent that video clip to my team and said, “Look at this and think about this as you’re prepping the car to go to NASA.” I kind of forgot about it. We went and ran the number. My video guy, when he edited together the video, he thought, gosh I’ll take that voiceover from Kennedy, and he overlaid that as we’re kind of prepping the car.

ALAN TAYLOR: It is so awesome.

JOHN HENNESSEY: And the thing that was just like -- like my wife when I was done at the first run at NASA. and we didn’t get to run the car, she said, “Are you disappointed?” I said, “Maybe a little bit,” but I said I had this special feeling like I was on hallowed ground being at NASA.
[Video Footage]

A building: NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center. An astronaut in a spacesuit walks on the moon.

[Audio]

I was a space geek as a kid. I was all into the NASA stuff. I remember watching Apollo 11 landing on the moon and Neil Armstrong putting his foot down on the moon for the first time, and I said, “I just had a very surreal feel that I was in a real special place the whole time I’m there.” So I said, “No, I’m not bummed out. We’re gonna go back and get the number,” and it’s just an incredible privilege just to have an opportunity to set a record in a place that, I mean, Americans have given their lives to, you know, break barriers and go into space and go to the moon. And so it was just something that I just felt very, very privileged and special. Then we got the number, you know, our world record certificate, we gave it to the NASA Director at the Kennedy Space Center, and that was a pretty cool deal, so we put that voiceover of Kennedy’s speech in our YouTube video --
[Graphic]

"Hennessey," written in red cursive against a black background.

Copyright HPE Design, LLC 2014

"Venom GT" in white and red.
[Audio]

KENNEDY: But why, some say, the moon? Why choose this as our goal?
[Video Footage]

Men examine the Venom GT.
[Audio]

KENNEDY: And they may well ask why climb the highest mountain?
[Video Footage]

The car races down the runway. A close-up of one of its wheels.
[Audio]

KENNEDY: Why 35 years ago fly the Atlantic?
[Video Footage]

A view of the car's interior components, followed by footage of the car speeding off into the distance.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: Fast forward a couple months later, I got a chance to go to Detroit.
[Video Footage]

A picture of a brown-haired smiling man in a suit and tie.
[Audio]

A good friend, Jim Farley, VP of Product and Marketing at Ford, invited me to come up and look at the new Mustang. So we go up, I go with my partner, Don, and we get to Detroit. It’s March and it’s snowing like crazy, so we get up there, and on our way to go see Farley and then go to the engineering building for Mustang, the power goes out, and we get a call from the Mustang guy saying, “Look, the power’s out, there’s no lights. The walkaround, the review of the car is cancelled.” I’m like, that’s a bummer, but we still get to see Farley. So we go to Farley’s office. We’re hanging out waiting for him to wrap up another meeting, and I’m just sitting there just checking my e-mails, and I look up, and down the hallway is this red-haired guy with a big smile on his face, Al Mulally, CEO of Ford. I’ve seen him at auto shows, I see him on the news a lot.

ALAN TAYLOR: Greatest guy in the world.

JOHN HENNESSEY: He’s retiring soon. I didn’t know a lot about Mulally. All I knew was he probably had a lot to do with the fact that Ford avoided the bailout and didn’t go into bankruptcy, so I heard all this great stuff about the guy.

ALAN TAYLOR: Absolutely.

JOHN HENNESSEY: I’m like, if he’s not making cars go fast, I’m not really studying him that closely, but I know he’s a good guy, and he’s got a lot of good guys working for him at Ford.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: The guy looks at me, a total stranger, smiles and waves just as he’s walking down the hallway to his board meeting.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: And I’m thinking...
[Video Footage]

John throws up his hands.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: That’s pretty cool.

ALAN TAYLOR: He knows who you are.

JOHN HENNESSEY: No, he did not know. I mean, I had to be--no, a total stranger. I’m some dude--I'm some guy there to see Farley.

ALAN TAYLOR: Right.

JOHN HENNESSEY: He didn’t know who I am. So I just thought, that’s pretty cool. This guy’s running one of the biggest corporations in the world.

ALAN TAYLOR: That’s the way that man is.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Well, I came to find that out. So I had a nice meeting with Jim, and then the next day I’m gonna get on a plane and come back to Houston. Well the day after that is our biggest track event at our facility in Sealy called TX2K. We have, like, 20,000 people coming for this race. So my partner Don is on Delta. He flies home. Gets out, no problem. The plane breaks. I’m stuck in the plane. I’m like...so, while I’m hoping the plane’s gonna get fixed, I’m sitting there twiddling my thumbs and start surfing around on my phone. I’m like, what’s the deal with this Mulally guy? How could some big time CEO that’s got the weight of a big company and hundreds of thousands of employees on his mind have enough joy in his heart to look at a total stranger, smile and wave? That just really kind of blew me away. Looked up his bio on Wikipedia, the second paragraph, when Alan Mulally was 17 years old, he heard Kennedy give the Moon Speech and that inspired him to want to become an astronaut.

ALAN TAYLOR: Look at that.

JOHN HENNESSEY: He ends up going to Boeing, rises up to CEO of Boeing, and now he’s at Ford running Ford. And I thought, I wanted to be an astronaut too, and that’s kind of -- I didn’t get to become a pilot or an astronaut, but I’m now modifying cars and got to set a record at Kennedy.

ALAN TAYLOR: Right.

JOHN HENNESSEY: That’s kind of a cool connection. So I e-mailed that little link to Farley, and I said, “Jim, this is kind of really cool. Your boss and I have this whole astronaut and NASA connection.” And I didn’t think much about it, so I’m bummed out, I’m wandering through the airport. I gotta go get my bags. I’m stuck. I gotta spend another night. I’m missing my big event at the track. I’m thinking, I could think of a lot of other things I could have done instead of going to Detroit for three days.

ALAN TAYLOR: Right. In the middle of winter.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Get to see Farley and have Mulally wave at me down the hallway. That’s cool, but I’m like -- anyway, I was bummed out. My phone rings, and it was Mulally’s secretary. “Mr. Hennessey, Mr. Mulally would like to speak to you.” Well, I guess Farley forwarded that e-mail to Mullally. Mulally -- I guess he hadn’t seen the video.

ALAN TAYLOR: What’d he say?

JOHN HENNESSEY: He watched it, and he picks up the phone and says, “John, Al Mulally. I just watched your video, and it brought a tear to my eye.”

ALAN TAYLOR: Isn’t that great?

JOHN HENNESSEY: And I’m in the middle of the Detroit airport.

[Video Footage]

Driver in suit and helmet and group of men and photographers at Kennedy Space Center celebrating. Three men, including John Hennessey pick up driver and carry him on their shoulders.

Photographs of John Hennessee, driver and another man with driver on shoulders.

Team photo.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: It’s that kind of -- I’m telling you, you guys gotta go look at this. It’s that kind of -- when you hear Kennedy, it is so powerful. Why do you think almost 7 million people have watched it, brother? Good job.

JOHN HENNESSEY: You know the thing about the Kennedy speech is that you think about Kennedy in ’61. He’s throwing out there the big, hairy, audacious goal. Our country is not only gonna put a man in space. The Russians kind of already, you know, beat us with Sputnik and we’re all -- it’s the Cold War.

ALAN TAYLOR: We’re gonna walk on the moon.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Yeah, we’re not just gonna put a man in space, a man is gonna walk on the moon. In 1961. He dies in ’63, and our country fulfills that promise in ’69.

ALAN TAYLOR: Yeah.

JOHN HENNESSEY: That just goes to show how powerful words are, how powerful the words of the President are -- Republican, Democrat, doesn’t matter. The President’s words have great power and great inspiration, and Kennedy was a very inspirational President.

ALAN TAYLOR: He was, he was.

JOHN HENNESSEY: And moving that forward, those words that Kennedy spoke, in some way led Alan Mulally to do a great job at Boeing--
[Video Footage]

Standing side by side, John Hennessey and Alan Mulally smile in a photo.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: Design and build all kinds of great aircraft that we sell all over the world. So the people all over the world send their money here, and now he did that with Ford.

ALAN TAYLOR: That is called the ripple effect. And you know what? You’re the kind of guy that also puts a ripple effect out there, because you do what you do in such an honest and honorable way with the machines that you work on and the quality of the work that you guys do, and now you have a Tuner School to teach the young and the interested -- ‘cause you don’t have to just be young. But you have risen up through the years through hard times like all of us.
[Video Footage]

Still photographs of classroom at Tuner School, students working on engine in shop.
[Audio]

JOHN HENNESSEY: Sure, sure.

ALAN TAYLOR: And to get to a place now where these giants like Shell and Alan Mulally, you know, they want to be with you.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Here’s my takeaway from the guys at Shell and a guy like Mulally: These guys reached out to a little guy and were decent and gave me their time and gave me their encouragement, and I’ve studied Mulally a lot since that phone call. I had a chance to meet him in his office. He gave me an hour of his time in Dearborn—
[Video Footage]

Photographs of John Hennessey sitting in Alan Mulally’s office. Alan Mulally standing beside him.

Photograph of John Hennessey and Alan Mulally standing next to a very large poster for Ford Motor Company. Alan Mulally holding a vintage copy of the Saturday Evening Post.
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: That’s awesome.

JOHN HENNESSEY: After his retirement was announced. And every day I wake up and I’m like, how can I be a better dad? How can I be a better husband? How can I be a better leader in my business? Because I’m like, these guys, the Shell guys, you know, they’ve got a lot going on. Mulally’s got a lot going on. He’s got a lot to worry about, you know, but he invested time with me. He made me feel special. How can I do that with whoever I meet? It doesn’t matter who they are.

ALAN TAYLOR: Well, you could not be a better friend. I’ll tell you that.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Thank you, brother.

ALAN TAYLOR: And I’m glad you’re investing time with me right now, because again, there’s the ripple effect. I’m the little guy in this case, and you’re giving me some of your time. I appreciate that.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Thank you, thank you. Appreciate the love.

ALAN TAYLOR: You guys, check out John Hennessey’s video of his record breaking run in Venom GT. It’ll blow you away. You’re a good man. Thank you very much.

JOHN HENNESSEY: Thank you. You, too.

ALAN TAYLOR: Keep up all the good work. And I’m gonna interview your guys at the Tuner School, too, ‘cause I want to learn more about that.

JOHN HENNESSEY: That’d be great. It’s a great story.

ALAN TAYLOR: Hennesseyperformance.com, correct?

JOHN HENNESSEY: That’s it.
[Text displays]

HennesseyPerformance.com
[Audio]

ALAN TAYLOR: Very good. I’m Alan Taylor. We’re here together in Houston for the Grand Prix.
[Graphics]

Shell and Pennzoil logos at the top of the screen over a yellow banner reading "Grand Prix of Houston. Presented by the Greater Houston Honda Dealers." Below the banner, Alan Taylor's signature lies under a white logo: "The Drive."
[Text displays]

Copyright 2014 Benchmark Entertainment ERN.

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